2011-2016 - Manifesto for Teaching Online - VVAA

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Texto

  • Online can be the privileged mode. Distance is a positive principle, not a deficit.* Place is differently, not less, important online.* Text has been troubled: many modes matter in representing academic knowledge. * We should attend at the materialities of digital education. The social isn't the whole story.* Opennes is neither neutral nor natural: it creates and depends on closures.* Can we stop talking about digital native?. * Digital education reshapes its subjects. The possibility of the 'online version' is overstated.* There are many ways to get it right online. 'Best practice' neglects context. * Distance is temporal, affective, political: not simply spatial. * Aesthetics matter: interface design shapes learning. * Massiveness is more than learning at scale: it also brings complexity and diversity.Online teaching need not be complicit with the instrumentalisation of education. * A digital assignment can live on. It can be iterative, public, risky and multi-voiced. * Remixing digital content redefines authorship. * Contact works in multiple ways. Face-time is over-valued. * Online teaching should not be drowngraded into 'facilitation'. * Assessment is an act of interpretation, not just measurement. * Algorithms and analytics re-code education: pay attention!. * A routine of plagiarism detection structures-in distrust. * Online courses are prone to cultures of surveillance. Visibility is a pedagogical and ethical issue. * Automation need not impoverish education: we welcome our new robot colleagues. * Don't succumb to campus envy: we are the campus.
  • Written by teachers and researches in digital education. University of Edimburgh.

(versión de 2016)

Video

A manifesto for teaching online. This video was created by James Lamb, one of the MSc in E-learning participants.

https://vimeo.com/35205074 (versión 2011)

A Manifesto for teaching online (2013 remix) created by James Lamb

https://vimeo.com/77766791 (versión 2013)

Contexto

Aparece en https://www.digitalmanifesto.net/manifestos/58/


The manifesto is a series of brief statements that attempt to capture what is generative and productive about online teaching, course design, writing, assessment and community. It is, and may remain, a living document that is reviewed and reworked periodically with colleagues, students and amongst the programme team of the MSc in E-learning at the University of Edinburgh. Its primary purpose is to spark discussion, and to articulate a position about e-learning that informs the work of the project team, and the MSc in E-learning programme more broadly. More at onlineteachingmanifesto.wordpress.com/

This video was created by James Lamb, one of the MSc in E-learning participants.

https://vimeo.com/35205074


Manifesto redux

Posted on September 14, 2015 by Jen Ross

The manifesto is four years old, and lots has happened in the digital education space since it was first published. We always said we wanted it to be a living document, so we are putting that principle into action and have spent the last few months revisiting the statements. This has been an interesting process of discussion and debate, both about what we still feel strongly about in the manifesto, and what we think it needs to take more or different account of in this time of of increasing attention to scale, materiality, code and automation in online education.

The Digital Education team will be relaunching the manifesto soon! We’ll update the blog when we have a publication date finalised.

https://web.archive.org/web/20150926024357/https://onlineteachingmanifesto.wordpress.com/


Manifesto video, 2013 remix

Posted on November 11, 2013 by Jen Ross

James Lamb, our fantastic colleague, and a student on the MSc in Digital Education, created a video remix of the manifesto at our request in late 2011. Last month, he decided to make a 2013 remix, because, as he says:

Influenced and informed by my own research into multimodality, I wanted to take a more critical approach to the representation of ideas within the video… Within this new version I’ve attempted to take a more rhetorical approach, where the images help to further the arguments proposed within the different Manifesto statements. I’ve also created a new soundtrack that it is intended to work more effectively alongside the images and words. I think that this new orchestration of communicational modes better represents the Manifesto (or at least, my interpretation of it).

https://web.archive.org/web/20150703023831/https://onlineteachingmanifesto.wordpress.com/2013/11/11/manifesto-video-2013-remix/


infolit ischool manifesto event in Second Life, Tuesday 13 November – all are welcome

Posted on November 11, 2012 by Jen Ross

You are cordially invited to this event in Second Life (SL), where Clara O’Shea will lead a presentation on the Manifesto along with fellow authors Jen Ross, Sian Bayne and Hamish Macleod.

The event is hosted by Sheila Webber (Sheila Yoshikawa in SL), at Sheffield University’s Second Life island, Infolit iSchool.

When: Tuesday 13 November 12 noon SL time (8pm UK time, see http://tinyurl.com/d3m6bzsfor times elsewhere) Where: Infolit iSchool, in the virtual world Second Life, (the location is http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Infolit%20iSchool/132/239/22 ).

All are welcome!

Sheila Webber will also open a ‘remix’ exhibit of the Manifesto at the event.

https://web.archive.org/web/20140217225255/http://onlineteachingmanifesto.wordpress.com/2012/11/11/infolit-ischool-manifesto-event-in-second-life-tuesday-13-november-all-are-welcome/


About the manifesto

The manifesto for teaching online was a key output from the Student Writing project at the University of Edinburgh. It is a series of brief statements that attempt to capture what is generative and productive about online teaching, course design, writing, assessment and community. It is, and may remain, a living document that is reviewed and reworked periodically with colleagues, students and amongst the programme team of the MSc in Digital Education programme (formerly the MSc in E-learning). Its primary purpose is to spark discussion, and to articulate a position about e-learning that informs the work of the project team, and the MSc in Digital Education programme more broadly. This position is best summarised by the first of the manifesto statements:

Distance is a positive principle, not a deficit. Online can be the privileged mode.

Such a position is at odds with dominant discourses of e-learning that describe it either in terms of replication of offline practices, or in terms of inadequacy, where e-learning is the “second best” option when “real” (face-to-face) learning is not available or practical. We reject both of these discourses, and the instrumental approaches to e-learning that tend to accompany them.

The manifesto was actively developed over a period of a year, June 2010–May 2011. It was grounded in the work of the project’s research associates and the key themes that emerged from their ethnographic accounts. It was shaped and refined during a series of intensive discussions amongst the project team that brought together our own research perspectives, knowledge, and teaching experiences.

We held a number of events in March and April 2011 to discuss and debate the manifesto. The first was part of the MSc in E-learning away day, and involved the whole programme team analysing and discussing the document. This was followed by a presentation and discussion session at the E-learning@Ed conference, a lunchtime seminar with invited colleagues from around the University, and a week-long collaborative writing and discussion event with students on the MSc in E-learning programme. Responses to the document ranged from excitement to discomfort, but the most important aspect of the process was the opportunity to discuss vital issues relating to e-learning with colleagues and students, and to draw out and debate positions that usually go unstated.

https://web.archive.org/web/20150711040201/https://onlineteachingmanifesto.wordpress.com/about/




Manifesto on the move

This is a (partial) list of remixes, reinterpretations, elaborations, blog posts, feedback and articles discussing the manifesto. Let us know if you see, make or write more. You can comment here, or send an email to jen.ross@ed.ac.uk.

The Edinburgh manifesto authors don’t take responsibility for the content of these, but do wholeheartedly approve of their existence.

https://web.archive.org/web/20150710180148/https://onlineteachingmanifesto.wordpress.com/manifesto-on-the-move/


En 2020 cambian a un nuevo sitio web The Manifesto for Teaching Online web site has moved to the University of Edinburgh’s Academic Blogging service! You can find us at: https://blogs.ed.ac.uk/manifestoteachingonline/


LIBRO

The Manifesto for Teaching Online (2020) By Siân Bayne, Peter Evans, Rory Ewins, Jeremy Knox, James Lamb, Hamish Macleod, Clara O'Shea, Jen Ross, Philippa Sheail and Christine Sinclair. MIT PRESS https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/manifesto-teaching-online


LICENCIAS

manifesto for teaching online by digital education, University of Edinburgh is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Manifesto for Teaching Online, 2016 / Manifesto for Teaching Online by blogadmin is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution CC BY 3.0

Autoras

About the authors

The manifesto authors are based in the School of Education at the University of Edinburgh, and are part of the programme team of the MSc in Digital Education and the Centre for Research in Digital Education.

The 2011 manifesto was written by the research team of the Student writing: innovative online strategies for assessment & feedback project (2009-11): Jen Ross, Siân Bayne, Hamish Macleod and Clara O’Shea.

Authors of the 2016 manifesto are:

- Siân Bayne - Peter Evans - Rory Ewins - Jeremy Knox - James Lamb - Hamish Macleod - Clara O’Shea - Jen Ross - Philippa Sheail - Christine Sinclair

https://web.archive.org/web/20170715165412/https://onlineteachingmanifesto.wordpress.com/about-the-authors/


Fuentes

Enlaces

URL:

https://onlineteachingmanifesto.wordpress.com

https://blogs.ed.ac.uk/manifestoteachingonline/

Wayback Machine:

https://web.archive.org/web/20120302013456/https://onlineteachingmanifesto.wordpress.com/ (versión 2011)

https://web.archive.org/web/20160817064107/https://onlineteachingmanifesto.wordpress.com/the-text/ (versión 2016)

https://web.archive.org/web/20200527082456/https://blogs.ed.ac.uk/manifestoteachingonline/ (nuevo sitio web de 2020)